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Kids Praised for Being Smart Are More Likely to Cheat

An international team of researchers reports that when children are praised for being smart not only are they quicker to give up in the face of obstacles they are also more likely to be dishonest and cheat. Kids as young as age 3 appear to behave differently when told “You are so smart” vs “You did very well this time.” The study, published in Psychological Science, is co-authored by UC San Diego developmental psychologist Gail Heyman.

Kids Praised for Being Smart Are More Likely to Cheat

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Kids Praised for Being Smart Are More Likely to Cheat
An international team of researchers reports that when children are praised for being smart not only are they quicker to give up in the face of obstacles they are also more likely to be dishonest and cheat. Kids as young as age 3 appear to behave differently when told “You are so smart” vs “You did very well this time.” The study, published in Psychological Science, is co-authored by UC San Diego developmental psychologist Gail Heyman.
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Tata Institute for Genetics and Society Advances with Building Naming, Inaugural Chair Holders
UC San Diego celebrated the dedication of a new building for the divisions of Biological and Physical Sciences on Sept. 12 with a special announcement. The cutting-edge science building will bear the name Tata Hall for the Sciences, or Tata Hall, in recognition of a $70 million gift from the Tata Trusts, which was committed last year to create the binational Tata Institute for Genetics and Society.
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UC San Diego Ranked a Top 10 Public University by U.S. News & World Report
The U.S. News and World Report Best Colleges guidebook ranks the University of California San Diego the nation’s 9th best public university, up one spot, compared to last year. For more than a decade, the publication has included UC San Diego in its list of the nation’s top 10 public universities.
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High Schoolers Doing Better than Expected with New Graduation Requirement But Many Still Struggle
A new report from the San Diego Education Research Alliance at UC San Diego sheds light on official graduation rates for San Diego Unified School District’s 2016 graduating class, the first cohort to graduate under new “college prep” requirements.

Top Stories

UC President Napolitano Affirms UC Commitment to Sexual Violence Survivors, Ensuring Fair Procedures

University of California President Janet Napolitano issued the following statement today (Sept. 22) following the decision by the Department of Education to rescind the 2011 Dear Colleague letter and the 2014 Q&A on Sexual Violence, and issue a new Q&A on Campus Sexual Misconduct. The federal changes…

UC San Diego-Led Expedition Documents Ancient Land and Sea Sites in Israel

UC San Diego-Led Expedition Documents Ancient Land and Sea Sites in Israel

A team of archaeologists from the University of California San Diego and two leading Israeli universities has wrapped up a three-week expedition to document two major sites in Israel using the latest in 3D scientific visualization technologies.

New Climate Risk Classification Created to Account for Potential “Existential” Threats

New Climate Risk Classification Created to Account for Potential “Existential” Threats

A new study evaluating models of future climate scenarios has led to the creation of the new risk categories “catastrophic” and “unknown” to characterize the range of threats posed by rapid global warming. Researchers propose that unknown risks imply existential threats to the survival of humanity.

People with Schizophrenia Left Out of Longevity Revolution

A team of researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and Veterans Affairs San Diego Healthcare System analyzed published longitudinal studies of mortality in schizophrenia that met their strict research criteria and found that the mean standardized mortality ratio – a measure…

UC San Diego to Celebrate Scientific Achievements of Sheldon Schultz

UC San Diego to Celebrate Scientific Achievements of Sheldon Schultz

The University of California San Diego’s Department of Physics is hosting a celebration open to the public called “Shelly Schultz Symposium: A Life in Science,” Monday, Sept. 18, 2017, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., at the Ida and Cecil Green Faculty Club on campus—guests planning to attend are required to…

Rady School of Management at UC San Diego Hits 150 Startup Company Milestone

Rady School of Management at UC San Diego Hits 150 Startup Company Milestone

With a thriving innovation ecosystem, San Diego is one of the top startup cities in the U.S. and the Rady School of Management has played a vital role in stoking the region’s economic engine. The school’s students and alumni have founded 150 operational startup companies since the school’s first…

When Artificial Intelligence is Funny—But Not on Purpose

When Artificial Intelligence is Funny—But Not on Purpose

What do you do if you’re an animal shelter and have to name a big litter of guinea pigs that suddenly become available for adoption and need to be named? Why, contact Janelle Shane, who earned a Ph.D. in electrical engineering at UC San Diego, of course. Shane works on lasers in her day job, but her…

Researchers Develop New Strategy to Target KRAS Mutant Cancer

In a new study, published this month in Cancer Discovery, University of California San Diego School of Medicine researchers report that approximately half of lung and pancreatic cancers that originate with a KRAS mutation become addicted to the gene as they progress.